Is RTI a billion-$$ boondoggle?

The Concept Of RTI: Billion-Dollar Boondoggle
by Beverley Holden Johns, James M. Kauffman, and Edwin W. Martin.

The writers argue that RTI and iterations known as tiered frameworks for education (e.g., one known as a multi-tiered system of supports, MTSS) are being widely implemented without necessary research confirming their superiority to the framework created in 1975 and known generally as IDEA. Widespread implementation of RTI and similar frameworks without reliable research evidence of their superiority to IDEA could, like many other efforts to improve education without reliable empirical evidence, be a very expensive mistake.

View a copy of The Concept Of RTI: Billion-Dollar Boondoggle in your browser (or, to download and save a copy on your own computer [189 KB], right- or control-click on the link and follow the directions in the dialog box that appears).

Vanderbilt Math or Reading Disabilities Position 2017

Vanderbilt University’s Department of Special Education Seeks Applicants for a Position in Applied Behavior Analysis

The Department of Special Education at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University invites applications for a tenure line position in the area of Applied Behavior Analysis. Although the position is open rank, we strongly encourage applications at the assistant and associate levels. The duties of the position are to: (1) develop and/or maintain a nationally recognized program of research on behavior analytic interventions for individuals with or at risk for disabilities, (2) seek external funds to support this program of research, (3) teach courses as part of a BACB-approved sequence to students from a variety of program areas (e.g., low incidence disabilities, high incidence disabilities, early childhood), (4) contribute to the ongoing development of the ABA program, (5) collaborate with faculty across program areas, (6) advise students in the ABA program, (7) partner with local districts and agencies that serve individuals with or at risk for disabilities, and (8) engage in service to the university and field. Affiliation with the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development is possible (http://kc.vanderbilt.edu). 

The successful candidate will hold a doctorate in Special Education or a related field with national certification as a doctoral level behavior analyst (BCBA-D). Expertise and experience in applied behavior analysis, as well as preparing practitioners in behavior-analytic assessments and interventions are necessary.

Candidates should submit an application letter describing their qualifications and how their accomplishments address the expectations noted above. They should forward curriculum vitae, three samples of scholarly writing, and contact information for three people from whom letters of reference may be requested. Screening of applications will begin November 1, 2016, and continue until the position is filled. Questions regarding this position should be directed to Mary Louise Hemmeter, Search Chair (ml.hemmeter@vanderbilt.edu).  Employment will also require a background clearance check.

Application materials should be submitted to: ABA Search, Department of Special Education, PMB 228 Peabody College, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203 (or electronically to ABAsearch@vanderbilt.edu).

Vanderbilt University has a student body of 12,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. Twenty-three percent of our students are from racially/ethnically diverse backgrounds. In addition, there are over 1000 international students from 84 countries. Vanderbilt values individuals who can share different points of view; strives to create an atmosphere where faculty of diverse races and ethnicities receive support from other faculty; and aspires to become a leader among its peer institutions in making meaningful and lasting progress in responding to the needs and concerns of all underrepresented groups. Vanderbilt University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. People of color, women, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Post-docs at U. Nebraska-Lincoln and Girls’ and Boys’ Town

Michael Epstein is searching for individuals with earned doctoral degrees in special education, psychology, or social work (or related disciplines) who are interested in developing research skills in the area of emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) by working on studies of programs and services for children and youths with EBD. Applications are open as of the date of this announcement and will be reviewed as they are submitted. Start dates begin August 2013 but are flexible. Download a PDF description of the post-docs for additional information.

Webinar on Evidence-Based Practices

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Webinar: Everything You Wanted to Know About Evidence-Based Practices (and Shouldn’t be Afraid to Ask)

On 8 March 2011, CEC and the Division for Research are co-hosting a webinar on evidence-based practices that DR has developed as a service to its members and to other university faculty and their graduate students. The webinar, presented by Bryan Cook, the new chair of CEC’s Committee on Evidence-Based Practices, explores what evidence-based practice means for researchers, teacher educators, practitioners and administrators, and how evidence-based practices differ from other practices that claim to be research-based. As with CEC/DR’s previous webinars, one registration can be used for a group, as long as the group is using one computer. All you need is an internet connection, a speaker phone, and a computer projector, and your entire group can participate in the webinar. After the webinar is over, you will receive your own copy of the webinar file, which you can keep to re-show to classes or other groups at your convenience. With the CEC member discount, each webinar registration costs only $89.00.

Click here to register online at the CEC web site.

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Easter Seals campaigns for early intervention

Under the headline “Tell President Obama To Help Kids With Disabilities Realize Their Full Potential,” Change.org promoted a petition encouraging support for early intervention for children with disabilities. It’s got to be difficult to sell people on the idea of increasing government expenditures in a time of substantial concern about federal deficits, but the Easter-Seals-sponsored petition is seeking to accomplish just that end. Here’s the pitch.

Continue reading Easter Seals campaigns for early intervention

Nebraska – Lincoln reading position

Position: The University of Nebraska – Lincoln (UNL), Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, announces a faculty position opening, at the rank of Assistant/Associate Professor, with an emphasis in reading disabilities and remedial reading assessments and interventions, beginning August, 2011.
Continue reading Nebraska – Lincoln reading position

UC Davis reading position

The School of Education at the University of California, Davis seeks an innovative scholar with expertise in Reading and Specific Reading Disability. The School of Education is especially interested in scholars with interests in neuroscience, learning science, and/or intervention science approaches to advancing effective methods of reading instruction for all children, and especially students with reading disability. Scholars interested in working with the diverse population of students, including English language learners (ELL) are encouraged to apply. The position will be a full-time, tenure-track appointment at the Assistant Professor level. The School of Education maintains strong collaborative relations with local school districts, the M.I.N.D. Institute for research on childhood neurodevelopmental disorders and intervention, and the departments of Human Development, Linguistics and Psychology, as well as the Center for Mind and Brain devoted to cognitive neuroscience.

For the particulars about this position, please download a PDF of the announcement and see the recruitment information from Davis.