The University of Arizona announces funding for doctoral students who want to become professors in special education

The University of Arizona announces funding for doctoral students who want to become professors in special education.

• Fellowships include:
o Full tuition
o An annual stipend of $30,000
o Funds for professional travel

• Our goal is to produce faculty skilled in evidence-based practice in their specialty area. Possible specializations include:
o Learning disabilities
o Bilingual/multicultural special education
o Deafness/hard of hearing
o Visual impairment and blindness
o Emotional and behavioral disorders
o Severe and multiple disabilities
o Positive behavioral support

• Doctoral students receive exceptional training through an apprenticeship model, engaging in the same activities that will be required when they become faculty

• A unique feature is a one-semester externship at another university with a leading scholar in the student’s specialization

• UA graduates are now faculty at universities and colleges across the country

•Learn more about the program and our application process at http://spedprof.arizona.edu

Chall grant 2011

Here is an annual announcement about a research opportunity in reading.

Scholars in the field of reading research are encouraged to submit applications for the 2011-2012 Jeanne S. Chall Research Grant. The purpose of this grant is to provide a stipend for a scholar to spend a period of time (usually from 2-8 weeks) at the Harvard Graduate School of Education to conduct research utilizing the Jeanne S. Chall Collection on the Teaching of Reading housed in the Monroe C. Gutman Library’s Special Collections Department. Additionally, the researcher will have access to other extensive reading resources available in Special Collections, Gutman Library and elsewhere at Harvard University. The Chall Collection consists of books and other materials related to the history of reading research and the teaching of reading, spanning both the 19th and 20th centuries. Most of the materials are dated from the 1950s through 1980s and include reading textbooks, curriculum sets, and scholarly works.

The research should focus on beginning reading, reading instruction, reading difficulty, or other related topics in the field. Additionally, projects may be historical in nature, focus on textual analysis, or relate to the research and writing of Jeanne Chall. The award will support travel to and from Cambridge and other expenses (up to a total of $2500). Applicants must hold a doctoral degree from an accredited institution of higher learning. Please include a current resume and a project proposal not exceeding 750 words in length. The proposal must include the applicant’s plan to disseminate the work resulting from her or his research. The application deadline is Friday May 13, 2011.

Send to Edward Copenhagen, Special Collections Librarian, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Gutman Library, 6 Appian Way, Cambridge, MA 02138; e-mail submission to: edward_copenhagen [at] harvard [dot] edu

IDA funding research projects

The International Dyslexia Association (IDA) announced a two-pronged effort to promote research about multisensory structured-language reading instruction. In one part of the effort, IDA seeks to raise funds from corporations, organizations, and interested individuals in support of research efforts; essentially, it seems, IDA is creating a fund that will be used to support research activities. In the other part of the effort, and a slightly surprisingly candid one, IDA is expressly calling for tests of whether multisensory structured-language reading instruction is as effective as its supporters presume that it is.
Continue reading IDA funding research projects

Jeanne S. Chall Research Grant

Scholars in the field of reading research are encouraged to submit applications for the 2010-2011 Jeanne S. Chall Research Grant. The purpose of this grant is to provide a stipend for a scholar to spend a period of time (usually from 2-8 weeks) at the Harvard Graduate School of Education to conduct research utilizing the Jeanne S. Chall Collection on the Teaching of Reading housed in the Monroe C. Gutman Library’s Special Collections Department. Additionally, the researcher will have access to other extensive reading resources available in Special Collections, Gutman Library and elsewhere at Harvard University. The Chall Collection consists of books and other materials related to the history of reading research and the teaching of reading, spanning both the 19th and 20th centuries. Most of the materials are dated from the 1950s through 1980s and include reading textbooks, curriculum sets, and scholarly works.

The research should focus on beginning reading, reading instruction, reading difficulty, or other related topics in the field. Additionally, projects may be historical in nature, focus on textual analysis, or relate to the research and writing of Jeanne Chall. The award will support travel to and from Cambridge and other expenses (up to a total of $2500). Applicants must hold a doctoral degree from an accredited institution of higher learning. Please include a current resume and a project proposal not exceeding 500 words in length. The application deadline is May 14, 2010.

Send to Edward Copenhagen, Special Collections Librarian, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Gutman Library, 6 Appian Way, Cambridge, MA 02138; e-mail submission to: edward_copenhagen [at] harvard [dot] edu

IRA reading grants

The International Reading Association (IRA) published descriptions of its grant awards. I’ve reproduced the descriptions here. See the end of the entry for links to the relevant parts of IRA’s Web site.

The Outstanding Dissertation of the Year Award is a US$1,000 annual award to those who have completed their dissertations on reading and literacy between May 15, 2007 and May 14, 2008. Studies using any research approach (e.g., ethnographic, experimental, historical, survey) are encouraged. Each study will be assessed in light of its approach, the scholarly qualification of its reports, and its significant contributions to knowledge within the reading/literacy field. Hurry, submission deadline is October 1, 2008.

The following grant programs, applicants can complete and submit their proposals electronically via IRA’s new online application system. Deadline for submission is January 15, 2009.

The Elva Knight Research Grant is a grant program of up to US$10,000 for research in reading and literacy. Projects should be completed within 2 years. Studies may be carried out using any research method or approach as long as the focus of the project is on research in reading or literacy. Activities such as developing new programs or instructional materials are not eligible for funding except to the extent that these activities are necessary procedures for the conduct of the research.

The Helen M. Robinson Grant is a US$1,000 annual grant to support doctoral students at the early stages of their dissertation research in the area of reading and literacy.

The Jeanne S. Chall Research Fellowship is a US$6,000 grant to encourage and support reading research by doctoral students. The special emphasis is to support research efforts in the following areas: beginning reading (theory, research, and practice that improves the effectiveness of learning to read); readability (methods of predicting the difficulty of texts); reading difficulty (diagnosis, treatment, and prevention); stages of reading development; the relation of vocabulary to reading; diagnosing and teaching adults with limited reading ability.

The Nila Banton Smith Research Dissemination Support Grant program assists in the dissemination of research (e.g., a literature review, meta-analysis, monograph, or other work) to the educational community. All International Reading Association members, including student members working on a research dissemination activity, are eligible to apply for the grant. The support shall not exceed US$5,000.

The Reading/Literacy Research Fellowship is a US$5,000 award to a researcher residing outside the United States or Canada who has evidenced exceptional promise in reading research and deserves encouragement to continue working in the field of reading. Applicants must have received a doctorate or its equivalent within the past 5 years.

The Steven A. Stahl Research Grant program, established to honor his memory and work, provides support for classroom research in reading and literacy instruction to promising graduate students who have at least three years of teaching experience. This is an annual award of US$1,000.

The Teacher as Researcher Grant program is available to preK-12 teachers with full or permanent half time teaching responsibilities, librarians, Title I teachers, classroom teachers, and resource teachers. Applicants may apply as a collaborative group or individually. Grant requests can be for up to US$5,000; IRA prefers smaller grant awards in order to provide support for as many teacher researchers as possible.

One must be a member of IRA to receive an award. Link to the research section of the IRA site.