University of South Florida doctoral studies

Professor Jeannie Kleinhammer-Tramill and colleagues at the University of South Florida are soliciting applications for a new cohort of Ph.D. students to begin doctoral studies in the fall of 2015. They are recruiting for a diverse group of individuals who want to prepare for roles as faculty members in special education and special education policy leadership. Those who are selected for the program will receive scholarships of up to $30,000 per year for full-time study to complete the doctorate in special education with emphasis on educational policy leadership. Download the accompanying flyer for additional information.

The University of Arizona announces funding for doctoral students who want to become professors in special education

• Fellowships include:
o Full tuition
o An annual stipend of $30,000
o Funds for professional travel

• Our goal is to produce faculty skilled in evidence-based practice in their specialty area. Possible specializations include:
o Learning disabilities
o Bilingual/multicultural special education
o Deafness/hard of hearing
o Visual impairment and blindness
o Emotional and behavioral disorders
o Severe and multiple disabilities
o Positive behavioral support

• Doctoral students receive exceptional training through an apprenticeship model, engaging in the same activities that will be required when they become faculty

• A unique feature is a one-semester externship at another university with a leading scholar in the student’s specialization

• UA graduates are now faculty at universities and colleges across the country

•Learn more about the program and our application process at http://spedprof.arizona.edu

The University of Arizona announces funding for doctoral students who want to become professors in special education

The University of Arizona announces funding for doctoral students who want to become professors in special education.

• Fellowships include:
o Full tuition
o An annual stipend of $30,000
o Funds for professional travel

• Our goal is to produce faculty skilled in evidence-based practice in their specialty area. Possible specializations include:
o Learning disabilities
o Bilingual/multicultural special education
o Deafness/hard of hearing
o Visual impairment and blindness
o Emotional and behavioral disorders
o Severe and multiple disabilities
o Positive behavioral support

• Doctoral students receive exceptional training through an apprenticeship model, engaging in the same activities that will be required when they become faculty

• A unique feature is a one-semester externship at another university with a leading scholar in the student’s specialization

• UA graduates are now faculty at universities and colleges across the country

•Learn more about the program and our application process at http://spedprof.arizona.edu

Post-doc at Children’s Learning Institute of U. Texas Health Sci Center

Post-Doctoral Fellowship Position
Children’s Learning Institute
UT Health: The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

The Children’s Learning Institute (CLI) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston invites applications for an Institute of Education Sciences sponsored 2-year Post-Doctoral Fellowship. The CLI has several federal- and state-funded projects in language and literacy, with a particular emphasis on preparing young “at risk” children for school and on understanding and addressing learning difficulties in school-age children and adolescents. Postdoctoral training is available in either a preschool or school-age strand with opportunities to obtain expertise in research on English Language Learning.
Continue reading Post-doc at Children’s Learning Institute of U. Texas Health Sci Center

Post-docs at U. Nebraska-Lincoln and Girls’ and Boys’ Town

Michael Epstein is searching for individuals with earned doctoral degrees in special education, psychology, or social work (or related disciplines) who are interested in developing research skills in the area of emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) by working on studies of programs and services for children and youths with EBD. Applications are open as of the date of this announcement and will be reviewed as they are submitted. Start dates begin August 2013 but are flexible. Download a PDF description of the post-docs for additional information.

mID / ASD opening at Boston College

Visit <www.bc.edu/lynchschool> for a full description.

The Lynch School of Education, Boston College, invites applications for the following position:

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, SPECIAL EDUCATION: The Department of Teacher Education, Special Education, and Curriculum and Instruction seeks to fill an assistant professor level tenure-track position in Special Education. Candidates should hold a Ph.D. or Ed.D. in special education or a related field. An active research agenda in elementary level mild/moderate intellectual disability and autism is required. Demonstrated potential for professional publication, grant writing, and leadership is also expected. Appropriate candidates will have expertise in teaching and/or research in school-based services and assessment, and a minimum of three years of K-12 professional experience in special education. Additional desirable areas of interest and expertise include response to intervention (RTI), positive behavioral supports (PBS/PBIS), universal design for learning (UDL), bilingual and urban education, as well as knowledge of early childhood education in addition to elementary.

Please submit your letter of interest and Curriculum Vitae electronically to administrative assistant Ms. Brenda McCormick (mccormba@bc.edu), also have three letters of reference sent directly to Ms. McCormick. All inquiries may be directed to Dr. David Scanlon (scanloda@bc.edu), Chair, Search Committee, TESECI Dept., Lynch School of Education, Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, MA 02467.

Pittsburgh doctoral training opportunity

Special Education faculty within the Department of Instruction & Learning at The University of Pittsburgh recently received a training grant from the US Department of Education Office of Special Education to support doctoral study in special education. They are recruiting a cohort of high-quality applicants to begin study in Fall 2012. People interested in learning about the program may download an informational flyer.

Interested applicants should contact Chris Lemons at lemons [at] pitt.edu for more information.

Recruiting Highly Qualified Students for Doctoral Study at the University of Illinois

Project LEAD
Preparing Leaders in Special Education, Access, and Data-based Decision
Making in High-Need Schools

Recruiting Highly Qualified Students for Doctoral Study at the University of Illinois

The purpose of Project LEAD is to prepare knowledgeable, dynamic leaders in the field of special education who have expertise in supporting students with disabilities to gain access to the general education curriculum in high-need schools. Project LEAD involves a) collaboration among faculty and doctoral students from the Departments of Special Education and other units in the college (i.e., Curriculum and Instruction, the Center for Education in Small Urban Communities); b) facilitating relationships between participants and leading researchers in the field of special education; and c)
developing intimate linkages with high-need schools locally and in Chicago. Project LEAD emphasizes five competency areas related to access to the general education curriculum:

  • Disability law and education policy
  • Improving outcomes through research and data-based decisions
  • Collaborative practices between regular and special educators in inclusive environments
  • Universal design for learning (UDL)
  • Service learning

Doctoral Program Support

  • Paid tuition
  • A yearly stipend for full-time 11-month participation
  • Annual stipend for conference attendance and research materials

Program Requirements
The Doctoral Program in Special Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign requires 64 credit hours beyond the master’s degree. Specialization in access to the general education curriculum will be achieved through:

  • Coursework: existing courses and newly created Advanced Topics courses on access;
  • Participation in the LEAD Seminar: bi-monthly meetings on research, teaching, and service issues related educating students in high-need schools;,
  • Technology: use of videoconferencing to engage with national and state experts; opportunities to use assistive and instructional technologies that promote access; and
  • Participation in traineeships: research, teaching, and service learning process on access in high need schools;
  • Early research and dissertation: an early research project and dissertation focused on access to the general education curriculum in high need schools.

Traineeship Experiences
Participants in LEAD complete a 20-hour paid traineeship each semester that focuses on research, teaching, or personnel preparation (depending on the semester) and allows collaboration with key faculty and leaders in the special and general education communities. Five types of traineeships are offered:

  • Collaborative research experiences with the trainee’s advisors on topics related to access to the general education curriculum
  • Research experiences addressing access to the general education curriculum in high need schools
  • Teaching experiences in university courses
  • Supervision experiences with student teachers in high need schools
  • Completion of a service learning project on access to the general education curriculum

A unique aspect of the program is its emphasis on access to general education in high-need schools. Through the Center for Education in Small Urban Communities at the University of Illinois, students have opportunities to partner with master teachers in high-need schools to conduct research, supervise student teachers, initiate service-learning projects, and apply concepts learned in their coursework and seminars to authentic situations in high-need schools. We believe the combination of coursework focused on current research and pedagogy related to accessing the general curriculum in high-need schools, and hands-on practice with research, teaching, and supervision in high-need schools prepares participants to serve as leaders in improving academic and functional outcomes for students with disabilities.

Doctoral Program Eligibility
To be eligible for the LEAD program, a doctoral student must have:

  • A Master’s degree in special education or a related field
  • U.S. citizenship or permanent U.S. residency
  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 out of 4.0
  • 2 or more years of experience with individuals with disabilities in school or community settings
  • Goals consistent with the program
  • A strong interest in research in the area of access to the general education curriculum

Doctoral Program Application Process
Interested applicants should submit an application to the doctoral program in Special Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign by going to the Department of Special Education website at http://education.illinois.edu/sped/AdmissionsDoctoral.html

For More Information Please Contact one of the Members of the LEAD Team :
Stacy K. Dymond at sdymond@illinois.edu
Lisa Monda-Amaya at lmonda@illinois.edu
Jan Gaffney at gaffneyj@illinois.edu
Karrie Shogren at kshogren@illinois.edu
1310 S. Sixth Street, 288 Education Building, MC-708, Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0260

Project LEAD is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Personnel Preparation to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities Program.

Doctoral students who receive funding from Project LEAD will be required to meet service obligation requirements set forth by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (http://www.serviceobligations.ed.gov/history.cfm)

Women, minorities and individuals with disabilities are particularly encouraged to apply. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

DI research fellows competition announced

The National Institute for Direct Instruction (NIFDI), which is a not-for-profit organization that supports efforts to implement Direct Instruction (i.e., “big DI”) the right way, is continuing its on-going competition for fellowships to conduct research on DI. The fellowships provide a stipend as well as additional support (e.g., training) to researchers at the masters, doctoral, or post-doctoral level. Learn more by downloading the accompanying flier (it’s clickable) or going directly to the NIFDI Web site or the page about the fellowships itself.

NIFDI flier

Buffalo tech-focused doctoral program

The University at Buffalo is recruiting students for a doctoral preparation program to begin in the fall of 2011. The program will support six students in a four-year program and will focus on preparing them to work in the Digital Age, specifically to use media, technology and communication tools. A research practicum with the Buffalo Public Schools is a major focus of this grant. Funding is available to support students in summer internships with experts in the field, including but not limited to:
Continue reading Buffalo tech-focused doctoral program

JHU doctoral studies

Johns Hopkins University is recruiting students for a doctoral preparation program to begin in the fall of 2011. The Hopkins program will support seven students in a four-year program and will focus on preparing them to conduct research about teacher education, integrate knowledge about exemplary special education teaching, and make a transition to special education faculty positions in institutions of higher education.
Continue reading JHU doctoral studies

VCU post-docs in positive youth development

POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP IN ADOLESCENT PREVENTION SCIENCE
VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY
CLARK-HILL INSTITUTE FOR POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT

The VCU Clark-Hill Institute for Positive Youth Development is seeking up to four post-doctoral scholars (full-time) to collaborate on a large-scale community-based intervention project. The Institute is a National Academic Center of Excellence on Youth Violence Prevention funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Institute is housed in the VCU Department of Psychology, but faculty, staff, and students from the School of Education, Department of Epidemiology & Community Health, School of Government & Public Affairs, and Department of Psychiatry, are also represented. The Institute’s mission is to empower youth, schools, families, and other stakeholders to promote the healthy, safe, and otherwise positive development of youth from early adolescence through emerging adulthood. Faculty within the Institute are engaged in a variety of research projects representing both applied research (e.g., risk and protective factors associated with youth violence) and development and evaluation of preventive interventions in school and community settings. Continue reading VCU post-docs in positive youth development

Hawai’i at Mānoa PhD program

The University of Hawai’i at Mānoa invites applications from people interested in advanced graduate studies in special education. The faculty at Hawai’i Mānoa seeks potential candidates for doctoral preparation as special education professors and teacher-educators with expertise in distance education, multicultural issues, evidence-based practices, and universal design for learning. Download a flyer and form for expressing interest here and learn more about the application procedures at http://coe.hawaii.edu/sped/phd.

RIF funding opportunity

Reading is Fundamental, the US nonprofit organization devoted to promoting reading and literacy, is soliciting proposals from university graduate students who would be willing to help conduct some research. The student who receives the award must analyze data and write a report of a study being conducted at Brooklyn (NY, US) Public Library. The study is to investigate the feasibility and impact of providing audio books to children with reading and developmental disabilities.

Upon completion of the project, the grantee will receive $3,000 in compensation. Digital media and special education majors are encouraged to apply. Proposals are due March 26. Direct questions to Patricia Oholeguy at 202.536.3476 or poholeguy [at] rif [dot] org. Learn more about RIF. Download a copy of the RFP.