U.Va. faculty positions for 2017

The Curry School of Education, Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education at the University of Virginia is seeking applications for multiple tenure-track and tenured positions in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Special Education in the area of Special Education. Rank is dependent upon qualifications. Areas of interest include: assessment, applied behavior analysis, response to intervention, instructional strategies in academic domains or behavior management. Faculty member(s) collaborate with program and department faculty developing and implementing teacher preparation programs and designing and delivering doctoral preparation. Other duties include mentoring doctoral students’ research and dissertation activities; advising undergraduate and graduate students on courses of study; and supervising graduate students’ practica and related learning activities. Incumbents are expected to design and conduct rigorous research, working with interdisciplinary faculty across the school and the University, and to be successful in seeking extramural research funding. Finally, faculty partner with local, state, national, and international organizations to formulate and secure appropriate policies and services for individuals with disabilities and their families, as well as service providers.

A Ph.D. in special education or a related field is required by the start-date of the appointment. Knowledge of experimental research methods (group contrast or single-subject or both) is essential, as is the ability to work collaboratively with colleagues. Experience working with children with autism or high-incidence disabilities including learning disabilities, emotional and behavioral disorders, or mild to moderate intellectual disabilities is preferred. Experience working with schools and school districts developing and implementing academic or behavioral programs is also preferred. At least three years of classroom experience teaching special education at the K-12 level is preferred, as is an outstanding teaching record at the post-secondary level. Preference will be given to candidates who have expertise in working at the primary and elementary (K-8) levels and who are eligible for licensure as a teacher in Virginia or another state.

For a tenure-track appointment, potential to obtain extramural funding for experimental or other causal-inference research in the areas of interest outlined above, including an already establish publication record is required.

For appointment as Associate or Full Professor without term the applicant must have an established national reputation, a documented line of research related to the areas of interest outlined above and a track record of existing and sustained extramural funding.

To apply visit http://jobs.virginia.edu and search on Posting Number 0619519. Complete a Candidate Profile online, attach a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statement of teaching philosophy, statement of research interests and contact information for three references.

Applicant review begins on October 17, 2016, and the search remains open to applicants until filled.
For information about the positions, please contact Bill Therrien, Professor and search chair at wjt2c@virginia.edu

For information about the application process, please contact Adam Pearson at jap8cc@virginia.edu.
The Curry School of Education and the University of Virginia are Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employers. We seek to build a culturally diverse intellectual environment and welcome applications from women, minorities, veterans, and persons with disabilities.

Investigation: Texas systematically denied students sped services

Brian M. Rosenthal of the Houston Chronicle published a report entitled “Denied: How Texas keeps tens of thousands of children out of special education” that documents systematic denial of special education services to approximately 250,000 students in Texas. Over the course of more than 10 years, Mr. Rosenthal reported, the Texas Education Agency routinely scored local school agencies (“LEAs”) on their compliance with state guidelines, one of which addressed the percentage of students identified for special education.

LEAs could earn a perfect score on that part of their report card only if they identified 8.5% or fewer of their students as needing special education. In 2015 the state was identifying 8.5%, a substantial drop from the nearly 12% it was identifying in 2004.

In detailed analyses, Mr. Rosenthal and his colleagues presented compelling graphics showing these changes. He also provided documents as well as the usual journalist cases to illustrate the strains on individuals and families.

Some Texas educators argued that the decreases are a consequence of improved instructional practices (e.g., adoption of response to instruction), but that position does not hold water. Were it true, the effects would be largely specific to learning disabilities, but Mr. Rosenthal noted, the decline is evident in multiple categories of special education in Texas. In addition, as an expert on response to instruction, Douglas Fuchs of Vanderbilt University, told Mr. Rosenthal, were those reforms to be working, then reading achievement would have risen in Texas; it has not.

U.Va. autism position

The University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education will hire a senior scholar with expertise in autism. The position, to be filled at the rank of associate professor or professor, will affiliate either with the faculty in special education (Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education) or clinical and school psychology (Human Services). However, the person filling it will also collaborate with other individuals throughout the University of Virginia (e.g., pediatrics, psychology) who are part of a university-wide initiative on autism and autism spectrum disorders.

Screening of applications begins 1 March 2015. The position is open until filled. For the official documents go to http://jobs.virginia.edu and search on Posting Number 0617962. Please download and review the accompanying announcement for more detail.

SUNY New Paltz position with emphasis on ASD

Assistant Professor of Special Education
Posting Date: October 21, 2015

Duties: The Department of Educational Studies at the State University of New York at New Paltz invites applications for a faculty position in Special Education to begin Fall 2016. This is full-time tenure track position in Special Education that requires specialization in the area of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).
The successful candidate will be expected to teach courses in Special Education practices (e.g., inclusive education, methodology, behavior management), supervise field experiences, and engage in research and other scholarly activities. In addition, the successful candidates will be expected to advise students and provide service to the school, university and community, which would include contributing to the development of college-wide interdisciplinary undergraduate and graduate program development activities in the area of ASD.

Continue reading SUNY New Paltz position with emphasis on ASD

SUNY New Paltz position with emphasis on adolescence

Assistant Professor of Special Education
Posting Date: October 21, 2015

Duties: The Department of Educational Studies at the State University of New York at New Paltz invites applications for a faculty position in Special Education to begin Fall 2016. This is a full-time tenure track position requiring specialization in the area of adolescent special education, preferably with expertise in behavior management and instructional methods.

In addition to teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in adolescent special education, the successful applicant will be expected to:

  • Participate in program development, review, and revision;
  • Engage in research and other scholarly activities;
  • Supervise field experiences;
  • Pursue external grants; and
  • Provide service to the school, university, and community, including advising students.

Continue reading SUNY New Paltz position with emphasis on adolescence

IDEA Celebration

IDEA 40th Anniversary Banner

ED Celebrates IDEA 40th—Live!

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of the U.S. Department of Education and its Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS), we are pleased to invite you to view two special events celebrating the 40th anniversary of the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

When IDEA was enacted in 1975, America pledged to provide and ensure that children with disabilities have opportunities to develop their talents and contribute to their communities. That pledge endures today and IDEA continues to provide not only access to the school house, to assessment and to the general curriculum, but the full promise of inclusion, equity and opportunity.


The White House
November 17, 2015
9:30–11:00 a.m., EST

Please share in this exciting White House event where Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, Delegated Deputy Secretary John King, OSERS Assistant Secretary Michael Yudin, and OSERS’ Office of Special Education Programs Director Melody Musgrove join the stage with youth impacted by IDEA, experts who will speak about the history and progress of IDEA, and families and teachers from the field who will provide their unique perspectives and celebrate this landmark legislation.

Please watch the White House event broadcast live:
https://www.whitehouse.gov/live


U.S. Department of Education
November 17, 2015
3:00–4:30 p.m., EST

The IDEA 40th Anniversary celebrations continue in the afternoon at the Department•s Barnard Auditorium with an IDEA Symposium where a panel of distinguished researchers share the state of evidence in special education and look towards the future for promoting even greater educational achievement by students with disabilities. Tune in live to the IDEA Symposium to view an inspiring slate of panelists including: Sharon Vaughn, Lynn Fuchs, Rob Horner, Lise Fox, Michael Wehmeyer, Lisa Dieker and David Test.

Please watch the IDEA Symposium broadcast live via EDstream:
http://edstream.ed.gov/webcast/Play/5948bd4d0065424d8a04c2cdd61745d31d

These two events will celebrate our past successes, but primarily focus on the future to ensure that infants, toddlers and youths with disabilities will continue to receive a free and appropriate public education that prepares them for their future. We encourage you to participate in the celebration by hosting opportunities for groups to watch the presentations and have discussions. Consider, holding your own local panel of youth, parents, teachers and other IDEA stakeholders; hosting a watch party in concert with a university class; or encouraging your school faculty to watch and engage in conversations about the history, impact and future of this legislation.

Submit Your Story

As part of our celebration of 40 years of the IDEA, we also want to hear from individuals with disabilities—especially children and youth with disabilities—parents, teachers, researchers and all other IDEA stakeholders about the personal impact this law has had on them.

  • How has IDEA made a difference to you?
  • What does inclusion, equity, and opportunity now look like for you?

Submit your art, photographs and stories by November 10, 2015 to our IDEA 40th Anniversary Web site [www.osep-meeting.org/ideaanniversary] for possible use for upcoming events in Washington, D.C., celebrating the 40th Anniversary of IDEA.

Follow us on Twitter:
@ED_Sped_Rehab

Hopkins Clinical Position for ECSE

Johns Hopkins University School of Education invites applications for a clinical Assistant Professor position with expertise in Early Childhood Special Education. Responsibilities include teaching graduate courses, advising master’s and doctoral students, engaging in scholarly activity, participating in school and university committees, developing and coordinating partnerships with area school systems, and seeking external funding for creative initiatives.

To see the full description of the position, please download the accompanying announcement.

Applications will be accepted immediately. Review of applications will begin 1 February 2016 and continue until the position is filled. Applicants should submit a letter of application and a current curriculum vita to the Special Education Search Committee c/o Connie Kinsley at ckinsley@jhu.edu. The position will remain open until a selection is made.

Three Texas A&M positions for 2016

The Special Education program in the Department of Educational Psychology at Texas A&M University is hiring to fill three positions to begin September 2016:

  1. Associate Professor of SPED in Transition/DD
  2. Assistant Professor of SPED in Autism and Applied Behavior Analysis
  3. Open Rank Clinical Professor of SPED

Full details are available here: http://epsy.tamu.edu/about/employment-opportunities

Iowa State Assistant Prof EBD position 2016

Assistant Professor of Special Education (Behavior Disorders) at Iowa State University

The School of Education (SOE), College of Human Sciences at Iowa State University is seeking applications for an Assistant Professor in the area of Special Education to begin in August 2016. The School seeks a dynamic, innovative, and enthusiastic colleague who will collaborate with special education and other SOE colleagues in developing rich and rigorous special education learning experiences and contribute expertise in behavior disorders. Building on these strengths, the School is committed to increasing its academic excellence, external funding, and diversity of faculty and students.

For the full position announcement, please visit our Web site. Once on the site, search by Vacancy ID #500141. To ensure consideration, submit application by 1 October 2015.

For additional information, you may also contact Search Co-Chair, Dr. Anne Foegen at afoegen [at] iastate.edu.

TED pre-conference on-line discussion

The Teacher Education Division of Council for Exceptional Children is fortunate to have Dr. Ann Turnbull and Dr. Mitchell Yell accept our invitation as the Keynote Speakers for the 2015 TED Conference. It is an honor to have such accomplished speakers provide insight into issues particularly relevant to our organization. They have graciously agreed to share their knowledge before the conference in an online discussion group. Participants will benefit from opportunities to exchange ideas, connect with colleagues, and broaden their knowledge on specialized topics that are the area of expertise of these two distinguished researchers. Please click here to learn more about this enhanced interaction with Dr. Ann Turnbull and Dr. Mitchel Yell before the conference. You can view the webpage at this address, however, we need the participants to use the following links to register so please do not put it in your announcements.

To register for the live online discussion group with Dr. Ann Turnbull, please go to this site for registration .

To register for the live online discussion group with Dr. Mitchell Yell, please go to this site for registration.

Goals:

  • Unique access to conference
  • To enhance the conference experience by providing an extended and enhanced/enriched interaction with Keynote Speakers
  • Interaction with leading and seminal researchers in the field focused around key articles and video presentations from the Keynote Speakers
  • Synchronous (scheduled virtual online discussion) and asynchronous (e.g. blog, video/Zaption) opportunities for interaction
  • Aligns with mission and vision of TED, including promotion of research-based practices, provision of professional development, and outreach for member engagement

Objectives:

  • Participants become familiar with the contributions of the Keynote Speaker(s) in special education teacher education
  • Participants will interact with peers and leaders in the field of special education teacher preparation.
  • Participants will have an opportunity to enhance the TED-CEC conference experience

Oregon Post-doc in academic interventions and assessment

Folks at the University of Oregon’s Center on Teaching & Learning (CTL) are hoping to fill the second year of an IES post-doc with a hard-working, recent Ph.D. graduate interested in academic interventions and assessment. This is a one-year appointment. Although the start date is 1 September 2015, it’s possible that date is flexible (e.g., the postdoc could start later in 2015 and be funded later into 2016). More information about CTL and our projects can be found here: http://ctl.uoregon.edu/. Download a PDF describing the position.

JSET Editor

The Technology and Media (TAM) Division of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) seeks applicants for the position of Editor or a Co-Editor Team, of the Journal of Special Education Technology (JSET), for a term offive years that will begin in January 2016.

JSET is a peer-reviewed, refereed professional journal, published four times a year by SAGE Publications. The journal presents up-to-date information and opinions about issues, research, policy, and practice related to the use of technology in the field of special education. JSET supports the publication of research and development activities, provides technological information and resources, and presents important information and discussion concerning issues in the field of special education technology to scholars, teacher educators, and practitioners.

If you are interested in learning more about this position, please contact Cindy Okolo at Okolo@msu.edu for a full position description.

Together again

In remembrance of Lynne Cooke, who passed away 7 July 2015, and Fred Weintraub, who passed away 2 May 2014:

Two Advocates for Students with Disabilities and Those Who Taught Them, Administered Special Education Programs, and Championed Their Rights.

Fred & Lynne at LC CEC Conf

How do students fare after HS?

The transition from high school to work, post-secondary education, and other alternatives is a challenge, especially for students with disabilities. In “Diplomas Count 2015: Report and Graduation Rates—Next Steps: Life After Special Education“, Education Week writers present their 10th analysis of how high-school graduates make that transition. Here’s how Christina Samuels, one of the contributors, described the work:

Each year, hundreds of thousands of students in special education graduate from their high schools.

And then what happens?

In the 10th annual edition of its Diplomas Count report, Education Week tries to answer that question.

The report is a blend of journalism and reseach: the Education Week Research Center delved into federal data to offer an important snapshot of where students with disabilities end up after they leave high school. My journalist colleagues and I give life to those numbers by talking to students as they make important future decisions about college and about work.

For example: Do students with disabilities tell their colleges about their special needs, or do they try to go without any of the supports they may have used in high school? (The answer: most of them do not disclose.) For students who are headed directly to the workplace, have they been taught how to advocate for themselves? (The answer: it’s hit-or-miss.)

Recommended reading.

Mizzou NSF postdoc

The University of Missouri’s Quality Elementary Science Teaching (QuEST) program is searching for a postdoctoral scholar. The person filling the position would work on designing, delivering, and studying a practicum-based professional development model for K6 teachers in science teaching. The position, which is funded by the National Science Foundation, would begin 1 July 2015.

For a full description and detailed contact information, download the accompanying PDF.