How do students fare after HS?

The transition from high school to work, post-secondary education, and other alternatives is a challenge, especially for students with disabilities. In “Diplomas Count 2015: Report and Graduation Rates—Next Steps: Life After Special Education“, Education Week writers present their 10th analysis of how high-school graduates make that transition. Here’s how Christina Samuels, one of the contributors, described the work:

Each year, hundreds of thousands of students in special education graduate from their high schools.

And then what happens?

In the 10th annual edition of its Diplomas Count report, Education Week tries to answer that question.

The report is a blend of journalism and reseach: the Education Week Research Center delved into federal data to offer an important snapshot of where students with disabilities end up after they leave high school. My journalist colleagues and I give life to those numbers by talking to students as they make important future decisions about college and about work.

For example: Do students with disabilities tell their colleges about their special needs, or do they try to go without any of the supports they may have used in high school? (The answer: most of them do not disclose.) For students who are headed directly to the workplace, have they been taught how to advocate for themselves? (The answer: it’s hit-or-miss.)

Recommended reading.

Published by

John Lloyd

John Lloyd--founder and lead editor for SpedPro.org